7 WRONG Ways to Decide Your Life’s Career

Career-Choices

An open letter to graduates.

by Sunny May 23, 2012

It’s that time of year again when a new crop of ambitious young folk will be graduating high school and heading off into their glorious futures by selecting the exact wrong career for themselves.

We all want nothing more than to have that perfect career that makes us feel like life is the equivalent of skipping through a summer field, with flowers in bloom all around and the golden sunshine on your face (this is a fictional world where there are no bugs in that summer field). Most of us instead end up with a career like that miserable camping trip where it rained the whole time and you were freezing and tired and hungry non-stop…oh yes, and lots and lots of nasty, crawling, dirty bugs.

Reportedly over half of American workers hate their jobs. Only 45% of Americans report being “satisfied” with their jobs. (Frankly if being “satisfied” means happy I’ll go shoot myself in the head right now.) Has this dearth of people in happy careers stopped succeeding generations from going through the same completely wrong process leading to the same terribly wrong decision? No. No it hasn’t. I’m not breaking any sound barriers here – I’m not going to tell you how to pick the right career – but here are 7 common, and completely wrong, ways people make career decisions that may lead to the TWENTY YEAR camping trip from hell.

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Will Your ADD Child Old Grow Up To Be A Gambler?

Psychologists can now determine by personalities that as young as three years old if your child might be future gamber.

According to a 30 year-long longitudinal study by University of Missouri’s Wendy Slutske and colleagues. They used data observing 939 individuals over as long as 30 years. 22 behavioral descriptors were tested to separate the participating toddlers into five temperament groups: under-controlled (10.4%), inhibited (7.8%), confident (27.5%), reserved (14.8%), and well-adjusted (39.6%).

The study found a 50 percent increase in the likelyhood to be a gambler in the under-controlled temperament group when checked again at 21 and 32 years of age compared to the other groups. These potential gamblers were described as restless, willful, impulsive, emotionally labile, impersistent, having fleeting attention, having expressed negativism, and withdrawing from tasks.

The report reasoned: “Perhaps it is the combination of impulsivity (or risk taking) in conjunction with the tendency toward negative emotions, such as anger, hostility, and anxiety, that constitutes the personality vulnerability for disordered gambling.”

The men in this study were significantly more likely than women to report disordered gambling at age 32 – 6.4 percent versus 1.9 percent.

Sounds a lot like the description of many ADHDers to me.
The link between ADHD and gambling is not new.

There are plenty of detractors as well, but the point is this. As parents it is our job to understand the issues involved and potential pitfalls to avoid when raising our children. Potential proclivity for gambling can be a serious issue and being forewarned is forearmed.

Good Luck,

Augie

 

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